Monthly Archives: March 2014

Caffeine Trivia 03.31.14

The British Coffeehouse boom comes to the colonies!  The first American coffeehouse opened in Boston in 1869 but there wasn’t a clear distinction between tavern and coffeehouse.  At Boston’s Green Dragon (1697 – 1832) they served coffee, tea and ale.  It was reported that it was there that James Adams, James Otis and Paul Revere met to form the rebellion that would lead Daniel Webster to call it the headquarters of the Revolution.

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Caffeine Trivia 03.30.14

December 29, 1675: King Charles II issued his Proclamation for the Suppression of Coffee Houses.  In it he banned coffeehouses as of January 10, 1676  since they had become “the great resort of Idle and disaffected persons” where tradesmen neglected their business.  Charles also included that the greatest problem with coffeehouses were that they were creating and spreading defamation of the government and the peace and quiet of the realm!  There was such an uproar and a fear that the monarchy might be overthrown – all over coffee – that 2 days before the proclamation was to take effect – it was withdrawn and Charles backed down.

Personal note:  Funny now that you look at this…since the Brits now prefer tea as their drink of choice!

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Caffeine Trivia 03.29.14

Edward Lloyd’s coffeehouse catered primarily to seafarers and merchants.  He  prepared “ship’s lists” for underwriters who met at his coffeehouse to offer  insurance.  And so began Lloyd’s of London – the famous insurance company.  Other coffeehouses became the birthplace of the Stock Exchange, the Banker’s  Clearing-house and several newspapers – The Tattler and The Spectator.

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Caffeine Trivia 03.28.14

Coffee first came to North America by way of
New Orleans back in the mid-1700’s. It was
successfully cultivated in Martinique about
1720, and the French brought coffee with
them as they began to settle new colonies
along the Mississippi.  The taste for coffee
and chicory was developed by the French
during their civil war. Coffee was scarce
during those times, and they found that
chicory added body and flavor to the brew. The Acadians from
Nova Scotia brought this taste and many other french customs
(heritage) to Louisiana. Chicory is the root of the endive plant.
Endive is a type of lettuce. The root of the plant is roasted and
ground.  It is added to the coffee to soften the bitter edge of
the dark roasted coffee. It adds an almost chocolate flavor to
the Cafe Au Lait served at
Cafe Du Monde.
The Cafe Du Monde Coffee and Chicory is
traditionally served Au Lait, mixed half and
half with hot milk. However, people have a
personal preference on how they like their 
coffee.  People like their coffee strong
and black, or with sugar; maybe with a
little more milk, or maybe a little weaker
brew.  Personal note:  Cafe Du Monde is a
must for any visitor to New Orleans.  Even this “Starbucks
Aficionado” makes many trips to Cafe Du Monde each and
every time I am in New Orleans.  I even bring home a couple of
cans of it’s famous coffee with chicory.
Source: Cafe Du Monde history

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Caffeine Trivia 03.27.14

“It is disgusting to notice the increase in the quantity of coffee used by my subjects, and the like amount of money that goes out of the country in consequence.  My people must drink beer.  His Majesty was brought up on beer, and so were his ancestors.”

   – 1777 Frederick the Great issued a manifesto in favor of beer

Personal note:  You read that right….in favor of beer!

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Caffeine Trivia 03.26.14

Bean Counter has a whole new meaning when it comes to coffee: In the 1700’s, a coffee-obsessed Ludwig van Beethoven ground precisely, yes precisely, 60 coffee beans to brew a single cup.

Personal note: I just want my coffee…don’t have the faintest idea how many beans I toss in the grinder…hmmm…I wonder???

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Caffeine Trivia 03.25.14

In 1732 coffee had become such a popular and controversial drink that Johann Sebastian Bach wrote his very humorous Coffee Cantata in which the daughter begs her father to allow her favorite vice:

“Dear father, do not be so strict! If I can’t have my little demi-tasse of coffee three times a day, I’m just like a dried up piece of roast goat!  Ah!  How sweet coffee tastes!  Lovelier than a thousand kisses, sweeter far than muscatel wine!   I must have my coffee, and if anyone wishes to please me, let him present me with – coffee!”

Personal note: A girl after my own heart….maybe I was her in a previous life!  Ha, ha!

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